[ mona / prog / sol ]

prog


A Lisp hacker

1 2018-10-31 18:20

You have to go deep underground to find their sites and repos, but it's worth it.

http://verisimilitudes.net/

2 2018-10-31 18:51 *

>>1
An intro to CHIP-8: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHIP-8

3 2018-10-31 23:36

Scheme is absolutely based and redpilled

4 2018-11-01 00:07

>>3
Yes and MIT Scheme needs some love.

5 2018-11-03 01:44

wtf I've talked to this guy, he makes lisp generals over @ lainchan

6 2018-11-03 01:45

>>5
Yes that's him! I've also met him on lainchan.

7 2018-11-07 13:14

Yeah, great app!

8 2018-11-07 16:52

>>1
Alyssa P. Hacker

9 2019-05-19 23:22

Hello there. I noticed this website in an HTTP referrer from my HTTP server logs. It's always flattering to be discussed somewhere I was previously unaware of. This website's rather similar to some other websites I've seen, but it doesn't seem to be the same website under a new name.

Unfortunately, I've not worked much on my Meta-Machine Code tool for the past several months, since it reached a state where it was usable back then, although I've given it a little work. I'm learning Ada 2012 and rewriting it in pieces, planning to have that finished by the end of this year, so I still have plenty of time.

Currently, I've taken up writing another Common Lisp library I'd planned a ways back, JSON-SUCKER; the idea is to permit efficient JSON manipulation by manipulating the string itself until proper and likely cheaper serialization is warranted, such as finding an object's key first and only then parsing what it's value is, rather than parsing the entire object and then searching for the key. This has the side-effect that it will be able to process incomplete JSON.

Is there anything you'd care to ask me?

10 2019-05-20 06:06 *

>>1
http://www.loper-os.org/ links to it.

11 2019-06-21 21:50

prince trippy has come to the thread

12 2019-09-19 10:16

It's unfortunate my last message received no response, but this is a slower place, I understand. I want to correct and point out this is that place I recall.

I no longer believe I'm going to finish the Ada 2012 rewrite of my MMC tool, so I'm going to be forced to do it in Common Lisp once more before the idea has enough structure to be translated into Ada.

I've written a new Common Lisp library, this one being experimental; feel free to tell me what you think:
http://verisimilitudes.net/2019-09-19

13 2019-10-04 21:16

Hello verisimilitudes.net author:

I am aware with some of your projects from lurking on the crustacean site. I consider your writing as must-read whenever it shows up there.

I have become less enchanted with that site over time -- maybe you would consider publicizing your work on here in addition to that site?

If you feel like continuing to chat, here's a question:

Do you have opinions on ECL and Clasp (excuse the conflation but I think you see what I am getting at)?

In your opinion do these implementations offer major ease of use advantages over CFFI?

The portablility tradeoff is obvious but I am sure there's a lot more to discuss...

14 2019-10-05 18:47

More recently, I've been rewriting the Common Lisp and gaining structure to my idea. Now I feel as if I may be able to continue with the Common Lisp or Ada, so at least I'm making good progress. Just yesterday, I started rewriting a Rule 30 implementation in CHIP-8 and greatly improving it, for the Octo Jam VI, and I forgot some details. I may have an article documenting it available, today.

>>13
Hello. Be made aware that I've been banned from that website, so you likely won't be seeing much of my work there any longer. I'm not upset about this, because I didn't particularly care for that website to start with; I much prefer these venues, where I need no account and whatnot; I'm not anonymous with this message, but that's by choice, as I could easily enter any discussion here anonymously. Here, I can only be judged by those messages that may be connected to me, whereas on that website I was judged by my entire history; I received too many ``downvotes'', apparently making my way to receiving the most out of anyone, and was banned for it. A lack of ``downvotes'' in these anonymous venues is another nicety, as the idea is clearly broken to anyone who cares to mull it over.

In any case, I'm glad you've enjoyed my work. I would consider mentioning my work here more regularly, but I don't want to obnoxiously use this website; it's also important to stress that, with what little I've done, I've arguably taken a more general thread and made it about myself, which could be considered poor form. If you'd care to be made aware of my recent going ons, I recommend you poll my RSS feed and occasionally poll my Finger service.

Do you have opinions on ECL and Clasp (excuse the conflation but I think you see what I am getting at)?

I don't know enough about Clasp to know how its interfacing compares to ECL's FFI:C-INLINE, et al. I prefer to write portable Common Lisp, so I'm only lightly intrigued by such interfacing, anyway.

In your opinion do these implementations offer major ease of use advantages over CFFI?

I don't use the CFFI, so I don't know. I've written little ECL interfacing and I very much dislike how FFI:CLINES only works when compiled, yet doesn't properly behave with EVAL-WHEN at :COMPILE-TOPLEVEL only; to get the behavior I needed, I had to wrap it with an IGNORE-ERRORS, instead, which I found ridiculous.

The portablility tradeoff is obvious but I am sure there's a lot more to discuss...

Programming with Ada has shown me how poor Common Lisp's interfacing functionality is and more of why I've been right to seek to avoid it. Writing a system interface binding is much more arduous, because one is restricted to what each implementation supports, if one wants to avoid CFFI and other such things which add complications. In sum, it's overly complicated and I'll continue to seek to avoid it where I can; sans networking and multiple threads of program execution, there's not much good reason to write such nonstandard Common Lisp, I think, and I'll simply take care to write even those programs in a way that avoids intimately marring them from such considerations. As an example, it's usually simple to see how to write a networking program that communicates over streams and leaves the actual system interfacing that connects it to the network elsewhere, so that the majority is perfectly portable Common Lisp.

Learning Ada has made me a better programmer, I think.

15 2019-10-06 01:58

But wouldn't your typical Lisp weenie be deterred by a relative lack
of interactivity when developing with Ada ?
I am not an Ada user (although I guess I could be persuaded -- I like
safety and standards, and I am willing to hit my head on the wall) but
it seems unlikely that a Slime/Cider (or even Python REPL) development
experience woul

16 2019-10-06 01:59

be available for Ada.

17 2019-10-06 02:00

I realize many people don't care about this but I would bet that many users of this board are attached to REPL-y development setups

18 2019-10-06 08:59

As an alternative to Ada, you could try ML or OCaml as a Lisp-descended languages with serious type systems and modules, but with garbage collection, functional style, and less verbose syntax than Ada. Haskell is even further in functional purity and precision types, but it is hacky in some ways, and it doesn't have ML-style modules.

19 2019-10-06 15:05

Great site.
>>14 Why were you banned from lameste.rs ?

20 2019-10-06 15:42

I’m attached, loaded, synchronised, sliced, diced, shaked, baked, reverberated, etched, tied, dyed and laterally laid back into my REPL even when I’m exfoliating.

21 2019-10-06 18:47

>>13
>>14
>>19
Crustacean website ? I have no memory of this website, and the link url >>19 gave seems to be an inside joke.
Could someone provide a link ?

22 2019-10-06 19:31

the site in question is lobste.rs -- it's populated by refugees from hacker news

23 2019-10-06 19:31

some people who got tired of that site have migrated here in turn it seems

24 2019-10-06 21:15

Someone, I don't know if the creator or not, has linked to this website from Hacker News, and so that explains the burst of activity. It had until recently not been uploaded; what a shame.

>>15

But wouldn't your typical Lisp weenie be deterred by a relative lack of interactivity when developing with Ada ?

That's required adjustment, yes. One of the reasons I learned Ada is because it's so different from every other language I knew. I figured if I was going to learn a language with strict and static typing, an unchangeable and keyword-based syntax, a lack of metaprogramming, and other things I'm unaccustomed to, that it should be Ada. The focus on reliability and readability are also appealing to me. I follow that advice of not learning a language that doesn't change the way I think of programming.

it seems unlikely that a Slime/Cider (or even Python REPL) development experience would be available for Ada.

Ada lacks an REPL. I compensate by writing small programs and compiling them, for testing and whatnot. For those languages I know best, I don't even need an REPL, as I simply know what the code will do beforehand, but I don't believe I'm there with Ada yet, at least with the standard and predefined libraries. The base of the language is rather simple and pleasant.

>>17
I'm not affiliated with any ``startup''.

>>18

As an alternative to Ada, you could try ML or OCaml as a Lisp-descended languages with serious type systems and modules, but with garbage collection, functional style, and less verbose syntax than Ada.

I told an acquaintance I'd learn Idris at some point, but that's still a ways away. If I want to write a functional program with concise syntax, I'll write more APL. I want to stress that I've been told this same thing before, I presume by another, and that ML fails in comparing to Ada for reliability concerns, which is a major reason to use it. I can write an Ada program that doesn't allocate any memory and properly responds to memory exhaustion, whereas it's my understanding this isn't reasonable in ML.

>>19
I was collecting more ``downvotes'' per month than anyone else on the website, apparently I was collecting nearly one hundred a month or whatever and the average is six or so. My Internet points were still increasing, but I was collecting ``downvotes'' and the administrator decided to ban me after a private conversation in which I pointed out how even my well-researched and well-written posts were called ``incorrect'', because someone disagreed with it, and how this reveals the Internet point system as mistaken in theory and implementation. So, simply put, I was banned because I was ``downvoted''. I asked the administrator to point out the particular rules I was violating, but he wouldn't and merely told me to avoid ``downvotes''. I'm accustomed to using actual rules for judging things, as anonymous systems don't permit following a history around, and I understandably find the entire situation pathetic on his part. With that explained, let's not continue to discuss this particular topic, if that's fine with you, as I don't enjoy giving the venue attention.

25 2019-10-07 02:20

>>24 Thanks for answering. You have my RSS aggregator, long live the web.

26 2019-10-07 10:11

>>22
Thanks, for french speakers, it looks a lot like journalduhacker.net

27 2019-10-07 12:20

>>42

reliability concerns

this is just larping though, I suspect most activities that you do can be glued together with a bunch of shell scripts, with roughly as much reliability requirements.

28 2020-02-09 19:40

I was wondering if this discussion would change between then and now, but I suppose this was never a particularly lively venue. I may as well mention my latest work now. I've written twenty-one articles since then. My second submission to the Octo Jam VI was the smallest submission ever received, being forty octets, and able to be smaller. November was rather a month of rebuttals, due to a lack of inspiration from elsewhere, and I quite liked the idea.

Rather than finishing my MMC reimplementation in Common Lisp, I focused on implementing SHA-1 thrice, and I'm planning to research and work towards two rather comprehensive SHA family implementations with design considerations taken from the earlier. As of writing, I've mostly finished the MMC reimplementation, in any case, and merely need to work on the prime loop and keyboard table before I can begin testing and further improving it.

I particularly enjoyed how Ada allowed me to create a SHA-1 design which was: simple; easy to use; lacking failure cases; based around preventing mistakes; and efficient, in that it performs no dynamic memory allocation. The Ada went on to influence the other two implementations, not only through the naming, but through the Pad procedure, which I'm particularly pleased with. Unfortunately, I've yet to get any opinions on my SHA-1 programs.

I've abandoned plans for JSON-SUCKER, as JSON is sufficiently complicated that my idea no longer seems worthwhile. I intend to learn some lesser or merely smaller languages this year and perhaps implement them in Ada and Common Lisp. I want to begin work on my own implementation of Common Lisp this year, also.

>>27
I suppose that's a valid criticism, but even were it playing pretend, it would still be worthwhile for its educational value. Anyway, I'm fascinated by making reliable programs and Ada makes it reasonably easy. My mentioned SHA-1 uses no dynamically-allocated memory, only local subprogram storage, as an example. With my design, it should also entirely lack failure cases, unlike other designs, and it's so nice to have something which must always work; I must note that my Word_Block type is a subtype of Word_Array, and so it's possible to get a Constraint_Error if the bounds are incorrect, but it's sufficient to point out that this isn't so extreme and even making the types incompatible wouldn't prevent someone determined from causing the error, and so if you simply only use Word_Block you'll simply always be free from this concern.

29 2020-02-15 17:07

>>27

... is just larping

As I understand it, LARP is specifically done in-the-flesh, but people use the term on anonymous forums to refer to... disingenuosity?

30 2020-02-15 18:14

>>26
It's always nice to see non-English speaking programming communities. Programming seems to be dangerously tied to the English language.

31 2020-02-29 20:30

Serendipitously came across this page: http://verisimilitudes.net/2019-11-12

The domain name looked familiar :^)

32 2020-07-09 21:58

Here's the reimplementation of my Meta-Machine Code targeted at CHIP-8, written in Common Lisp, released on the third anniversary of its announcement:
http://verisimilitudes.net/2020-07-07

There's still work to do, but I'll do so with less stress now. I want to pursue other work, such as writing one of the many Common Lisp libraries I've envisioned, continuing with my Ada programming, etc.; I'd like to start implementing languages this year, but my novel machine text system, Ellision, may steal away much of my time in stead of such.

I don't want to write a long post, so I won't. Feel free to ask any questions concerning this work.

33 2020-07-10 05:55 *

>>1
This guy has always annoyed me. Whatever site you find him he's just self-promoting his articles, while at the same time acting like aristocracy. That's why he got banned from lobste.rs: https://lobste.rs/s/o9ndzz/masturbation_language_2017

34 2020-07-10 06:37 *

>>33
Isn't it the fascist mod from Lainchan's /λ/?

35 2020-07-10 09:01 *

>>34
I didn't know he's a mod, I just through he creates the Lisp thread, as to promote his site.

36 2020-07-10 13:36 *

>>33-35
I do agree that he lacks humility, and this is a major character flaw. In his defense I will say he's only about as fascist as Singapore, and the Lisp thread series predates his website by a good bit (it predates lainchan as well if I remember correctly), and he's willing to talk about anything programming related if you catch him on IRC. Further, I don't think his hubris was the only reason he was banned from Lobste.rs (although it surely didn't help), but more for his disagreement with pretty much every value of the community that uses that site. You just can't hate the web, UNIX, and virtually all other modern computation in a community basically designed for the promotion of these things for another example see the following: https://dev.to/shamar/i-have-been-banned-from-lobsters-ask-me-anything-5041 The reason I say this is because he has four times as many comments as posts, and his stories typically had fairly positive feedback in contrast to his comments: https://lobste.rs/threads/verisimilitude

37 2020-07-10 16:50 *

>>36

You just can't hate the web, UNIX, and virtually all other modern computation in a community basically designed for the promotion of these thing

Not a literal Luddite but definitely WWW hate here, http://n-gate.com . The site owner is still part of these communities. If you have nothing nice to say don't say anything at all, is good for moles and sleeper agents in closed gardens, lol.

38 2020-07-10 17:36 *

>>36

You just can't hate the web, UNIX, and virtually all other modern computation in a community basically designed for the promotion of these things

You actually can, you just shouldn't end your message with "and if you disagree with me, the supreme genius, you are an imbecile moron". You've got to be a troll or really obnoxious to get banned from lobste.rs, and the verisimilitudes guy is certainly in the latter category.

39 2020-07-10 17:54 *

>>37
Sure, but I think you understood what I meant.

>>38
I don't think that's the case, his hubris seems to be limited to being very adamant about his opinions rather than explicit egomania (although that doesn't exclude the presence of egomania in a more subtle form). Also Shamar was pretty polite in my opinion, and he was still removed: https://lobste.rs/threads/Shamar

40 2020-07-13 21:06

>>37

I run n-gate. I've never had a lobste.rs account. It seems to be a web forum devoted to discussing lobste.rs users. Nothing worth reading.

41 2020-07-14 08:28

Incidentally, is it just me or is lobste.rs slowly turning into another Hacker News?

Most stories are 90% the same as those of Hacker News, and the discussion quality in most of them are not that much better.

42 2020-07-14 11:49

>>41
To a certain degree, it' inevitable. The invite-system only prevents spam-ish behaviour until a certain point. But at least it's not a libertarian/startup stronghold.
>>39

Also Shamar was pretty polite in my opinion, and he was still removed

I think that was a mistake too, but he was wierd. Imagine someone having to ephasise, parts of his sentence, making the impression that you're shouting a message like a doomsday prophet.

43 2020-07-15 17:29 *

>>40
I'm failing to believe you but Poe's law and keep the good work up. I do think lobste.rs is a circle jerk though, the anon who could invite me is a big hugbox goer.

44 2020-07-15 21:22 *

>>40
When will we see a Jerkcity crossover?

45 2020-07-18 00:52 *

>>43
*hugs you*

46 2020-07-20 15:40 *

>>45
This post triggers me, *inaudible confused snake noises*.

47 2020-07-25 14:47 *

>>46

*inaudible confused snake noises*

But why a snake?

48 2020-08-01 06:53

I'm a tad disappointed at the lack of any questions. I wasn't aware anyone was aware of the Lisp General threads and didn't know I'd only recently started linking to my website instead, so that I could more easily update the resources, but suppose it's not so surprising; it predates Lainchan, yes, by a few months. I've recently finished an implementation of SHA256 in Ada, in preparation for a comprehensive SHA, as with APL and Common Lisp. I also intend to release another little CHIP-8 game to elaborate during the Octo Jam VII, in a few days. I'm in communications with the hoster, so I may finish some games ahead of time, and still get them featured anyway, in a post-session. CHIP-8 is a reasonably nice little machine code, and I've ideas for some interesting games, and how to achieve them well, but I won't drone on further for now.

49 2020-08-01 08:27 *

>>47
Anthropomorphic ssssssnakes are known for having an permanent lissssssp in their asssssssscent.

50 2020-08-01 12:26

>>36

You just can't hate the web, UNIX, and virtually all other modern computation in a community basically designed for the promotion of these things

Ultimately, you're right, but have you taken a look at HN/Lobsters recently? Every second article is about how the industry is morally bankrupt or built on complex pillars of sand. I'll admit, I used to enjoy reading those doomsday prophets too, but now it just strikes me as dishonest. It's kind of smug self-depreciation, as if the world could be saved if only the high priests of HN could save it. The really biting alternative blogs like LoperOS et al are hardly seen.

Also agree about Versimilitudes/Lisp/Prince Trippy. My impression talking to him on IRC is that he can be overly serious and unyielding in his convictions, but always presents his comments in good faith.

51 2020-08-01 15:28

>>49
I've been keeping track of your blog, have fun with your octojam submission!

>>50

Every second article is about how the industry is morally bankrupt or built on complex pillars of sand.

I think most of this is just people wishing we could return to the late-1990s and early-2000s before the dot-com bust when things were simpler and products served their users rather than the other way around. It's not a rejection of the internet and UNIX but of change, and further they seem to rarely offer anything actionable, and even less often which goes beyond just a shallow changing of consumer preferences.

52 2020-08-02 02:09 *

>>51
Wait I'm adding stomp integration.

53 2020-08-05 19:53

>>49
That's pretty funny

54 2020-08-16 02:34

>>50
If you're going to go against modern computing, you should at least have something interesting to say instead of just shallow and derogatory shit like "Rust is the effeminate man's Ada". It's no wonder he wasn't liked on HN, because he would just bloviate about his favourite hipster languages with no actual substance.

55 2020-08-16 02:39 *

>>54
Hate to doublepost, but I should also add that this is why people should generally stay anonymous. Once I found out who he is I couldn't stop seeing him as a clown even in places like the Lisp General.

56 2020-08-16 02:40

>>54

Rust is the effeminate man's Ada

I know I should feel guilty but I laughed out loud.

57 2020-08-16 04:03 *

>>55
Interesting, I actually started thinking the opposite after reading his blog. He's definitely an interesting character.

58 2020-08-16 19:28 *

>>57
I spoke to him once and he was very friendly. He's opiniated, sure. He's a Lisp hacker.

59 2020-08-29 08:15

The absolute state of Hacker News: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=24286065

[MixedName – Bilingual baby name finder] 591 points
Zero effort code, 255 comments, every one a variation on "let me tell you about the time I also racemixed/took the intersection of 2 sets".

60 2020-08-30 03:53

>>59
You know this and still visit the site anyway?

61 2020-08-30 04:43

>>59
You need to go back.

62 2020-09-02 01:53 *

>>60-61
Once in a blue moon someone posts a interesting article or write-up (for me to bookmark and then never read).

It's okay as a link aggregator, I know never to look at the comments but sometimes curiosity gets the best of me and I can't wait for n-gate.

(not him btw)

63 2020-11-07 23:18

My procrastination meant I finished but two games for the seventh Octo Jam, the same amount I finished last year, but these were more complex and more fun than last year's, so at least I managed those. Documenting these are amongst my current latest articles. I also wrote an article reflecting on this Octo Jam and what I did, including how I came across a rare flaw when using mine MMC, which has made me realize that an alternative internal representation I've before considered is the only reasonable option.

Whilst rewriting the CHIP-8 targeting again would be best, I'm too tired for that, and instead will simply hunt down the flaw and correct it. My future targetings will use this new, higher-level internal representation, and be better for it. Before I move to a real machine code, I'm considering either the LMC or MIX as the next targeting, as these have qualities which make them particularly nice for such experimentation, and I've also given a great deal of thought to the interface I want to present for an accumulator machine, which will be fun.

I'll pursue this in tandem with adding more commands to the CHIP-8 targeting. The large amount of pure machine code available for CHIP-8 that I've documented left me wanting for an easy means to associate names without the possibility of making a mistake, and I've envisioned a command enabling this:
The command will accept a name, and scan the program space for instructions supporting such an association and having an equivalent value; so, I'd be able to name an address with a label and then tell it to search out associations, and it would only seek out the XYYY instructions, 0XXX, 1XXX, 2XXX, AXXX, and BXXX.

This is a command I'd wanted in the old implementation, but was going to be too difficult to add. I expect to use a newer reimplementation of the MMC targeted at CHIP-8 in the next Octo Jam. To anyone who cares to watch it, the after-jam Octo Jam stream can be viewed here; it's shorter than those preceding it:
https://invidious.snopyta.org/XIN3hi85IoE

>>54

If you're going to go against modern computing, you should at least have something interesting to say instead of just shallow and derogatory shit

I don't think I'm boring. I strive to consider and reach novel solutions to problems, rather than merely doing the same as others are content to. Rather than claim we should respect all language encodings, or that we should just make everything UTF-8 Unicode because awful systems can't cope with more than one system encoding, I recognize both options are horrible, and that storing text as character streams is stupid; this is what mine Elision system will be.

Rust is the effeminate man's Ada

That's based on simple observation, and I stand by it. It may be found amusing I was even impotently threatened by someone for this joke over IRC, a long ways back.

It sickens me when people genuinely believe Rust is somehow the first programming language to make safety a goal, when it doesn't even do that. Articles from groups which should, and do, know better imply this, and they do this maliciously. It's similar to how articles will mention ``open source'', and always avoid mentioning Free Software, because just the thought someone may grow curious and look is dangerous to the agenda. My one hundredth article, 2020-09-24, is about this lack of knowledge regarding computing history, with people believing whatever lies fools will tell them, and it's very disconcerting.

It's no wonder he wasn't liked on HN, because he would just bloviate about his favourite hipster languages with no actual substance.

I've learned that Hacker News and Lobsters aren't venues for substantive conversations. They don't last long, names encourage people mentioning irrelevant posting history, and, worst of all, most conversations in these link aggregators involve what others are doing elsewhere. A forum such as this supports long conversations, without names, and about people actually doing things, which is in heavy contrast.

It's akin to the differences between creators and mere fanatics.

>>55

Hate to doublepost, but I should also add that this is why people should generally stay anonymous.

I'm often anonymous, but it was rather inevitable I was going to grow that identity I'd fostered into something more. It's a shame that I could've tarnished the Lisp General at all, but expanding this identity beyond Lisp has generally lead to better things.

>>57
I see this manner of reaction as that more common towards what I've done with the identity, and I'll also add that it's nice to read someone enjoys reading my work.

64 2020-11-12 23:20 *

>>63

I've learned that Hacker News and Lobsters aren't venues for substantive conversations.

I'm going to have to be skeptical of your criticisms when you've been banned from both platforms.

65 2020-11-13 00:30

That after-jam Octo Jam stream isn't actually shorter, there was merely an issue on mine end in downloading it the first time.

>>64
I wasn't banned from Hacker News, I merely don't use it anymore. The OpenBSD Ada binding I wrote made it to the front page, but I'm inclined to believe the title hit hipster bingo more than anything else; there's no dearth of interesting topics which get many upvotes and little conversation there. I'd rather not discuss either of those venues much more, but, as for that other, is it so surprising? I wasn't the most obnoxious there, with my self-promotion, merely the most honest about it; I don't want to drag irrelevant others into the conversation, but anyone who uses that website should be able to think of at least one other person who's much worse with how he does it. In any case, it's not the people, per se, but the very structure of those forums which I find so rotten.

Now, need we discuss either poor venue further; I'd much rather discuss something more interesting.

66 2020-11-13 01:18 *

>>65

I'm inclined to believe the title hit hipster bingo

Why does this sound more fun then it really is.

67 2020-11-14 14:08

Can't wait for glorious software ecosystems lisp hackers will create with x100 the productivity of blub.

68 2020-11-15 17:46

>>65
What variadic tuple-based functional programming frameworks for Ada you recommend?

69 2020-11-15 19:30

>>68
The way this has been phrased makes it seem as if it be not a real question. I don't recommend using frameworks and such things. I write the libraries I need. Ada subprograms can't accept a variable number of arguments, but can accept arguments of varying sizes. A tuple here could be an array, record, or private type, based on what's needed. Enumeration and array types are particularly nice in Ada, and better usage of enumeration types have bled into mine other programming because of it. I suggest looking at mine OpenBSD Ada binding for something which may be relevant to this:
http://verisimilitudes.net/2019-07-27
gopher://verisimilitudes.net/12019-07-27

70 2020-11-16 00:28

My procrastination meant I finished but two games for the seventh Octo Jam, the same amount I finished last year, but these were more complex and more fun than last year's, so at least I managed those.

Your games seem pretty fun this year, (certainly a more fun than last year) too bad the commentator mistook Advanced Asphyxiation for a graphical demo.

71 2020-11-25 04:23

Happened already, on threads about Rands.

72 2020-12-05 16:42

I'm wondering if there might be some sort of contradiction between intelligent end-points and server side computation. That is to say would a focus on intelligent end-points discourage the use of server side resources to pre-compute information relevant to the clients in a manner that saves overall resources. Taken to the radical extreme aspiring to the virtue of intelligent end-points might push one to relatively inefficient distributed systems.

I also wonder if some insight might be gained by seeking to generalize the proposition beyond computing systems, and shifting focus from the objects to the relations. For example perhaps communications in a business should maximize information density by crafting communications protocols which reduce book keeping cost.

Perhaps analogies from this domain could then be transferred back to the original domain, for example what can be concluded about the reduced book keeping cost of universal in contrast to means-tested benefits. Perhaps that our compound data types should be standardized, and that protocols should be established on this basis.

73 2020-12-06 01:44

>>72 disregard that post please

74 2020-12-06 02:40 *

>>73
Read it long ago.

75 2020-12-28 09:06

This is merely a notice I've released the Little Man Computer targeting:
gopher://verisimilitudes.net/12020-12-26
http://verisimilitudes.net/2020-12-26

I wrote a doubly-linked list library, D, for use in this program, and now it lives on its own, and will be updated at my leisure and all of that. This has been a successful enough test of the new and higher-level internal representation of mine MMC model, although I still need to add some commands; one command which would've been particularly arduous to add to my satisfaction, moving a block of code to a new address, becomes trivial under this.

The newest CHIP-8 targeting uses parallel arrays to maintain internal order. This LMC targeting uses a doubly-linked list holding tagged data instead. Labels are no longer names with a true boolean, but point directly into the list structure, and this is resolved as needed, which means it's much harder to accidentally write a bug which leaves such names in an improper state; while this means there could potentially be performance issues, this won't actually happen in practice, and could be trivially cached when redrawing the entire display, where this the case.

I've been giving great thought to how a recollection system would be written, and there are many nice tricks I could do to make this very easy, such as making name deletion which stores the information O(1) time and space complexity, because it wouldn't actually remove the name, simply requiring dead names to be treated specially by the rest of the machinery instead, but I'm still far from this.

Rather than maintain an array storing the program, it's stored as instruction objects, names, and integers; it's only pressed to its numerical representation when saving. This should make other commands, such as automatic name association, much easier to write. I'm still working and experimenting, but I like it better than the last model, and it seems fine, so far.

76 2020-12-28 11:37 *

Alyssa P. Hacker

77 2020-12-30 19:46

>>75

Rather than maintain an array storing the program, it's stored as instruction objects, names, and integers; it's only pressed to its numerical representation when saving.

The new D library and this seem pretty /cozy/ to me, low stress without compromising on principles. The latter makes me wonder if you've considered persistent recollection at all (e.g. saving deltas to disk)?

Unfortunately, there's little draw in but a shell of an interface that must be filled in before use.

I've been trying to think some about your recollection system. It seems to me the system could be a little more than a shell with regards to efficiently implementing CHANGE and RECALL on objects with assessors. CHANGE could have SETF style semantics and interface. You could then have a NEW-MEMORY procedure which takes an optional INVERSE procedure, it establishes a new group of entries in the history to be undone at once, which would be filled with calls to CHANGE between it and the next call of NEW-MEMORY or RECALL. Groups would then be either a record of variables to old values CHANGE'd or an inverse function. The RECALL system then mutates the variables to the old values or calls the inverse function and then pops off the last element of the history. The inverse function could be of course replaced by an encoding in the history for a more efficient representation.

You would still need to implement a history representation with assessors used by the rest of the program if you want something different than the default (e.g. undo in region), and the inverse functions to RECALL for more complex operations, but the base case would be covered and you would have the capabilities to cover the remaining cases on an as needed basis, I think. This should allow without any new declarations the recollection of the name deletion scheme as described.

There is still opportunity to optimize further, by combining words which are partial contiguous subsets from either end, and each combining can be weighed against every other to determine the optimal configuration. This will be done later.

In Elision does this indicate a willingness to reify roots and cases (even Chinese characters have radicals)? You lose some of the efficiency of a compression scheme without the constraint of semantic significance, but you gain easier semantic analysis and addition of new words derived from roots and cases but not yet in the dictionary.

78 2021-01-08 07:25

>>77
Excuse that this reply isn't better. I've been tired lately.

The latter makes me wonder if you've considered persistent recollection at all (e.g. saving deltas to disk)?

No. That belongs in the operating system. On this note, a recollection system is equivalent to these version control systems, but of course better in every way. There's no particular reason why it should only be possible to recall earlier changes from one session, rather than all sessions, and having such a system in place makes it obvious the VCS is unnecessary. That is, these should be the same things, in the same sense IRC and email should be, because the only distinctions are the queer disjoint features and intent.

It seems to me the system could be a little more than a shell with regards to efficiently implementing CHANGE and RECALL on objects with assessors. CHANGE could have SETF style semantics and interface.

The issue is how I can't transparently intercept everything, so it's more explicit than I'd want. Ultimately, I should just implement an MMC recollection system at some point, and then reflect on it to continue.

You could then have a NEW-MEMORY procedure which takes an optional INVERSE procedure, it establishes a new group of entries in the history to be undone at once, which would be filled with calls to CHANGE between it and the next call of NEW-MEMORY or RECALL.

That NEW-MEMORY name is unworkable. I chose CHANGE and RECALL so they'd be equal lengths.

Groups would then be either a record of variables to old values CHANGE'd or an inverse function. The RECALL system then mutates the variables to the old values or calls the inverse function and then pops off the last element of the history. The inverse function could be of course replaced by an encoding in the history for a more efficient representation.

Perhaps I didn't make it clear the history should be traversable both ways.

In Elision does this indicate a willingness to reify roots and cases (even Chinese characters have radicals)?

Yes. I'd like to store infinitives and have declining rules and a list of exceptions, for languages such as Latin and Esperanto; this would result in text being stored as a list of such infinitives and other bases, with the particular rule to apply attached with the particular usage. For English, this may be less reasonable, and at least the initial version of that targeting will simply have a code for every possible word; English may benefit more from separate tables which hold such information, with which to perform analysis.

I learned Latin to improve mine English, and it slowly but certainly showed me how deformed and sickly it has become.

You lose some of the efficiency of a compression scheme without the constraint of semantic significance, but you gain easier semantic analysis and addition of new words derived from roots and cases but not yet in the dictionary.

It's not necessarily less efficient, if the quantities align correctly.

79 2021-01-08 18:29

>>78

That NEW-MEMORY name is unworkable. I chose CHANGE and RECALL so they'd be equal lengths.

Perhaps RETAIN then, it seems far more consistent with your other names, and the semantics are still correct. This does not matter as it is too explicit for your liking, and if I understand correctly you would like CHANGE to be like this RETAIN except operating transparently on visible mutations in its scope rather than with the explicit addition of a journaling mutator. I suppose the objects with visible state could have the journaling mutator be set as their writer. This would make recollection transparent to the caller, and would allow for your scope based interface. Was this more along the lines of what you were thinking?

Perhaps I didn't make it clear the history should be traversable both ways.

This was clear to me but I still proposed a scheme which did not take this into account. Even if RECALL was implemented in terms of CHANGE my proposal does not have a clear buffering mechanism for the calls to CHANGE occurring during repeated calls to RECALL. The interface seems like it would become more complicated here as well since there are multiple ways to handle recollection at this point (e.g. tree undo, and Emacs undo). I think I now understand a bit better your claims to the necessity of a shell of a system.

English may benefit more from separate tables which hold such information, with which to perform analysis. [...] It's not necessarily less efficient, if the quantities align correctly.

I was thinking this as well actually. I'm glad I seem to be understanding Elision even if I lack the linguistic depth to fully understand how best to implement it.

I learned Latin to improve mine English, and it slowly but certainly showed me how deformed and sickly it has become.

I suspect it's largely a myth that only young people can learn languages well; regardless, I feel the need to learn a language before my myelination is complete. English being a creole of Old English and a koine of creoles, and being the global lingua franca encouraging further creolization leads me to believe it can not be trusted. I think there may have been some benefits to this process, namely the imprecision of the language might have encouraged simplification of ideas as in analytic philosophy (also pragmatism and simple engineering (think American vehicles)), but this does not mean one should want to speak a language which discourages precision! At the minimum I must learn English grammar as my country seems to think it fit to deny human beings the birth right of language similar to that story of the Indian king who trapped infants in a cage to prevent exposure to language under the deluded notion that such an act would lead to the development of the gods' language rather than the apes he would come to find.

Excuse that this reply isn't better. I've been tired lately.

Don't feel overly obligated to reply. Progress has assured me that I am a fool.

80 2021-01-08 21:53 *

>>78

On this note, a recollection system is equivalent to these version control systems, but of course better in every way. There's no particular reason why it should only be possible to recall earlier changes from one session, rather than all sessions, and having such a system in place makes it obvious the VCS is unnecessary. That is, these should be the same things, in the same sense IRC and email should be, because the only distinctions are the queer disjoint features and intent.

I really like this idea by the way (I think it's a rather old one), just forgot to reply.

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