mona


Do you play Shogi?

1 名無しさん 2020-05-28 12:46

I like the story of how a Shogi master once entered a regular Chess tournament, having barely studied the game, and started beating everybody, much to their amazement. A non-classed player that nobody ever heard of, defeating International Masters. Coming from the Shogi game, his style was extremely aggressive, which is refreshing in the current state of Chess.
After a few games the other players noticed something was off with this mysterious beginner, They finally learned he was a Shogi prodigy and started devising dirty slowpoke chess tricks to win against him. He didn't win the tournament but performed an IM norm. Nowadays it's common for the best Chess players to learn Shogi in order to improve their Chess skills.

http://eric.macshogi.com/shogi/pros/habu/yvelines/habu-gb.html
An interview: https://en.chessbase.com/post/when-a-shogi-champion-turns-to-che
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoshiharu_Habu

It tooks much longer for computers to beat humans. The first time happened in 2010 when Akara 2010 won against top women's shogi player Ichiyo Shimizu: https://cacm.acm.org/news/99998-computer-beats-human-at-shogi-japanese-chess-for-first-time/fulltext

There are many sites where you can play online, but if you want to train alone there's GNU Shogi: https://www.gnu.org/software/gnushogi/

XBoard also supports the following Shogi engines: Shokidoki, TJshogi, GNU Shogi and Bonanza

If you're curious to try the strongest engine*, you'll have to run ShogiGUI with elmo and yaneura ou under wine or follow the instructions here (in Japanese) https://linuxfan.info/elmo-sdt5-on-linux

(*) Actually Google's Alpha Zero AI pummeled elmo in 2017

2 名無しさん 2020-05-28 18:02

Xiangqi (Chinese Chess) is more laid-back.

3 名無しさん 2020-05-29 05:40

I've tried learning it as a decent chess player already. It's tough and not intuitive to me. I'd like to read books to learn the principles, but hardly any are translated.

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